AngularJS

AngularJS Components

Basic Components and LifeCycle Hooks

What’s a component?

  • A component is basically a directive that uses a simpler configuration and that is suitable for a componentbased architecture, which is what Angular 2 is all about. Think of a component as a widget: A piece of HTML code that you can reuse in several different places in your web application.

Component

angular.module('myApp', [])
 .component('helloWorld', {
 template: '<span>Hello World!</span>'
 });

Markup

<div ng-app="myApp">
 <hello-world> </hello-world>
</div>

Live Demo

Using External data in Component:

We could add a parameter to pass a name to our component, which would be used as follows:

angular.module("myApp", [])
 .component("helloWorld",{
 template: '<span>Hello {{$ctrl.name}}!</span>',
 bindings: { name: '@' }
 });

Markup

<div ng-app="myApp">
 <hello-world name="'John'" > </hello-world>
</div>

Live Demo

Using Controllers in Components

Let’s take a look at how to add a controller to it.

angular.module("myApp", [])
 .component("helloWorld",{
 template: "Hello {{$ctrl.name}}, I'm {{$ctrl.myName}}!",
 bindings: { name: '@' },
 controller: function(){
 this.myName = 'Alain';
 }
 });

Markup

<div ng-app="myApp">
 <hello-world name="John"> </hello-world>
</div>

CodePen Demo

Parameters passed to the component are available in the controller’s scope just before its $onInit function gets called by Angular. Consider this example:

angular.module("myApp", [])
 .component("helloWorld",{
 template: "Hello {{$ctrl.name}}, I'm {{$ctrl.myName}}!",
 bindings: { name: '@' },
 controller: function(){
 this.$onInit = function() {
 this.myName = "Mac" + this.name;
 }
 }
 });

In the template from above, this would render “Hello John, I’m MacJohn!”.

Note that $ctrl is the Angular default value for controllerAs if one is not specified.

Live Demo

Using “require” as an Object

In some instances you may need to access data from a parent component inside your component.

This can be achieved by specifying that our component requires that parent component, the require will give us reference to the required component controller, which can then be used in our controller as shown in the example below:

Notice that required controllers are guaranteed to be ready only after the $onInit hook.

angular.module("myApp", [])
 .component("helloWorld",{
 template: "Hello {{$ctrl.name}}, I'm {{$ctrl.myName}}!",
 bindings: { name: '@' },
 require: {
 parent: '^parentComponent'
 },
 controller: function () {
 // here this.parent might not be initiated yet
 this.$onInit = function() {
 // after $onInit, use this.parent to access required controller
 this.parent.foo();
 }
 }
 });

Keep in mind, though, that this creates a tight coupling between the child and the parent.

Components In angular JS

The components in angularJS can be visualised as a custom directive (< html > this in an HTML directive, and something like this will be a custom directive < ANYTHING >). A component contains a view and a controller. Controller contains the business logic which is binded with an view , which the user sees. The component differs from a angular directive because it contains less configuration. An angular component can be defined like this.

angular.module("myApp",[]).component("customer", {})

Components are defined on the angular modules. They contains two arguments, One is the name of the component and second one is a object which contains key value pair, which defines which view and which controller it is going to use like this .

angular.module("myApp",[]).component("customer", {
 templateUrl : "customer.html", // your view here
 controller: customerController, //your controller here
 controllerAs: "cust" //alternate name for your controller
})

“myApp” is the name of the app we are building and customer is the name of our component. Now for calling it in main html file we will just put it like this

<customer></customer>

Now this directive will be replaced by the view you have specified and the business logic you have written in your controller.

NOTE : Remember component take a object as second argument while directive take a factory function as argument.

Source
AngularJS Notes for Professionals book
Tags

Ahmed Mohamed Abd ElMajeed

Web developer and Server Administrator, Founder of Akwad web School and Programmer Notes.

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